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    Taleban mark turbulent first year in power

    KABUL (AFP) – Taleban fighters chanted victory slogans next to the United States (US) embassy in Kabul yesterday as they marked the first anniversary of their return to power in Afghanistan following a turbulent year that saw women’s rights crushed and a humanitarian crisis worsen.

    Exactly a year ago, the hardline extremists captured Kabul after a nationwide lightning offensive against government forces just as US-led troops were ending two decades of intervention in a conflict that cost tens of thousands of lives.

    “It’s the day of victory and happiness for the Afghan Muslims and people. It is the day of conquest and victory of the white flag,” government spokesman Bilal Karimi said on Twitter.

    The chaotic withdrawal of foreign forces continued until August 31, with tens of thousands of people rushing to Kabul’s airport hoping to be evacuated on any flight out of Afghanistan.

    Images of crowds storming the airport, climbing atop aircraft – and some clinging to a departing US military cargo plane as it rolled down the runway – aired on news bulletins around the world.

    Taleban fighters celebrate one year since they seized the Afghan capital, Kabul. PHOTO: AP

    Authorities have so far not announced any official celebration to mark the anniversary, but state television said it would have a special programme to mark the event.

    Many Taleban fighters gathered in Kabul’s central Massoud Square, where they displayed the regime’s white banners and performed a traditional dance, some holding weapons and others taking pictures on their mobile phones.

    “We all are happy that we are celebrating our independence in front of the US embassy,” Aminullah Sufi Omar told AFP.

    Taleban fighters expressed happiness that their movement was now in power – even as aid agencies say that half the country’s 38 million people face extreme poverty.

    “The time when we entered Kabul, and when the Americans left, those were moments of joy,” said Hekmat, now a member of the special forces guarding the presidential palace.

    For many ordinary Afghans, however, the return of the Taleban has only increased hardships – especially for women.

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