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Monday, August 15, 2022
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Brunei
Monday, August 15, 2022
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    After two pandemic years, a summer travel bounce – and chaos

    JERUSALEM (AP) – At a tourism conference in Phuket last month, Thailand’s prime minister looked out at attendees and posed a question with a predictable answer.

    “Are you ready?” Prayuth Chan-ocha asked, dramatically removing his mask and launching what’s hoped to be the country’s economic reset after more than two years of coronavirus-driven restrictions. When the crowd yelled its answer – yes, according to local media – it might have been speaking for the entire pandemic-battered world.

    But a full recovery could take as long as the catastrophe itself, according to projections and interviews by The Associated Press in 11 countries in June. They suggested that the hoped-for rebound is less like a definitive bounce – and more like a bumpy path out of a deep and dark cave.

    Some locales, such as the French Riviera and the American Midwest, are contributing to the climb more than others – like shuttered, “zero-COVID” China, which before the pandemic was the world’s leading source of tourists and their spending.

    The human drive to bust out and explore is helping fuel the ascent, packing flights and museums despite rising coronavirus infections and inflation. But economic urgency is the real driver for an industry worth USD3.5 trillion in 2019 that the United Nations (UN) estimates lost about that much during the pandemic. By some estimates, tourism provides work for one in 10 people on Earth.

    Many places, particularly those that have loosened safety requirements, are seeing what passes for a go-go summer of sunny optimism and adventure.

    “They are saying it’s the summer of revenge travel,” Pittsburgh resident Theresa Starta, 52, said as she gazed across one of Amsterdam’s canals at crowds thronging to the Dutch capital. “Everything seems so bad all around the world, so it’s nice to see some things coming back.”

    Tourists take a selfie in front of the Trevi Fountain in Rome. PHOTO: AP

    “The road to a full recovery is very long, but at least we are back on it,” said Sanga Ruangwattanakul, president of the Khao San Road Business Association in Bangkok.

    Despite the roaring return of travellers, challenges and uncertainty cast shadows over the post-pandemic landscape. Full recoveries are generally not expected until at least 2024.

    Concerns hovered around a long list of issues, including inflation, supply chain problems, rising infection rates and labour shortages.

    Before June was over, chaos had come to define travel in the summer of 2022. Airports and airlines that had cut back during the depths of the pandemic struggled to meet the demand, resulting in cancelled flights, lost baggage and other, assorted nightmares. Spooked tourists booked trips on shorter notice, making it harder for hotels, tour operators and others to plan, industry insiders said.

    The Russian invasion of Ukraine, too, added risk to the uneven recovery and contributed to inflation – a factor that could become a major obstacle even as other pandemic pain recedes.

    “It’s really the fall season that is of concern,” said Sandra Carvao, chief of market intelligence and competitiveness at the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). If inflation continues to rise, particularly interest rates, “families will have to rethink their spending”.

    For all of the lifted virus travel restrictions, safety is not likely to recede as a concern.

    “The most important thing for people when they decide to go on vacation is health and safety. Always has been,” said a professor of tourism at the University of South Carolina Simon Hudson, who is writing a book about the pandemic recovery. “This is going to take awhile.”

    Starting with the bright spots, the UN reported that during the first quarter of 2022, international arrivals almost tripled over the same three months last year.

    March this year produced the healthiest results since the start of the pandemic, with arrivals climbing to nearly 50 per cent of 2019 levels.

    That could rise to as much as 70 per cent of 2019 arrivals by the end of this year, the UNWTO said in projections it revised in May.

    That’s produced encouraging signs in certain places, from Israel to the United States (US), Italy, Mexico and France. Resets like Thailand’s are all the rage. Big plans for 2023 are in the offing in the US, such as a cruise featuring some of Broadway’s biggest stars.

    Those projections are playing out on the ground, generally in places that had aggressive and agile restrictions early-on and adapted by lifting many protections as vaccinations rose and the Omicron variant proved less lethal than other variants.

    Foreign tourists are flocking to places like the French Riviera, where supply-chain issues are making everything more expensive.

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