25.4 C
Brunei
Sunday, January 29, 2023
25.4 C
Brunei
Sunday, January 29, 2023
More
    - Advertisement -

    Eating right for 2023

    Dani Blum

    CNA/THE NEW YORK TIMES – As we welcome 2023, we take a look at our coverage of food and nutrition over the past year and reflect on what we have learned about eating (and drinking).

    Here are some of our favourite nuggets of healthy wisdom:

    CHIA SEEDS DESERVE A PLACE IN YOUR DIET

    The superpowered seeds found their way into puddings, pretzels, jams and TikTok trends in 2022 as chia – once again – rose to popularity. Experts said chia seeds have earned their hype: They’re packed with fibre and rich in antioxidants.

    You can add a tablespoon of seeds to a smoothie or soak them in plant milk to make a snack.

    YOU CAN FEEL BETTER ABOUT THAT MORNING COFFEE

    Researchers found that people who drank one and half to three and a half cups of coffee per day, even with a teaspoon of sugar, were up to 30 per cent less likely to die during the study period than those who didn’t drink coffee – another reason to justify reaching for your first (or second, or third) mug.

    FOODS CAN HELP HYDRATE YOU

    You don’t need to rely solely on water to replenish fluids; your favourite fruits and vegetables are also great sources of hydration. Reach for melons, strawberries, oranges, grapes, cucumber or celery.

    LIMIT THE AMOUNT OF PROCESSED MEATS YOU EAT

    The occasional hot dog won’t wreck your health, but processed meats have been linked to cancer, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

    Plant-based alternatives are a safer bet, but they’re not all equal: Find an option that’s as minimally processed as possible.

    MAKE WHOLE GRAINS A STAPLE

    Most people aren’t eating enough of them, but you can go against the grain by incorporating these high-fibre foods, like oats or corn, into your diet.

    A slice of whole wheat bread, a half cup of cooked oatmeal and three cups of popped popcorn, in combination, would satisfy the recommended daily requirement for whole grains.

    SWAP YOUR AFTERNOON TEA FOR MATCHA

    This bright green tea powder is ubiquitous, and while there isn’t definitive research to show it’s a health food, matcha may have some benefits, including providing abundant antioxidants and plenty of caffeine.

    STEER CLEAR OF STICKY SNACKS

    Dried fruit, candy, gummies – these foods can lodge in your teeth and the spaces between them, allowing sugar to linger in your mouth and fuel bacterial growth.

    There are, some steps you can take to ward off tooth decay, including chewing sugar-free gum.

    - Advertisement -
    - Advertisement -
    spot_img

    Latest article

    - Advertisement -
    spot_img