29.7 C
Brunei
Tuesday, September 27, 2022
29.7 C
Brunei
Tuesday, September 27, 2022
More
    - Advertisement -
    - Advertisement -

    East Timor president pushes back on environmental criticism

    WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND (AP) – Give our country USD100 billion – or stop lecturing us about making money from fossil fuels.

    That was the message East Timor President and Nobel Peace Prize winner José Ramos-Horta had yesterday for those raising environmental concerns about his nation’s proposal to build a new gas-processing plant.

    Ramos-Horta was speaking in Australia after the two countries signed a new defence agreement. He delivered his remarks at the National Press Club in Canberra with humour but also with an edge.

    East Timor, an impoverished nation of 1.5 million, is hoping to break a 20-year deadlock with the new Australian government over the development of the Greater Sunrise gas field that lies beneath the seabed separating the two countries.

    Australia wants the gas piped to an existing gas hub at its northern city of Darwin. East Timor expects more economic benefit if the gas is piped to its south coast.

    Ramos-Horta was visiting Australia in part to try and resolve the dispute. A reporter asked how East Timor could justify the project given the climate impacts.

    East Timorese President Jose Ramos-Horta signs the visitors’ book as Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese watches ahead of a bilateral meeting at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia. PHOTO: AP

    Ramos-Horta replied that gas was cleaner than some fossil fuels. He then listed countries that had benefitted from fossil fuels, including the United States (US) and Japan, and then later China and India.

    “But first the Europeans, you were the ones who polluted the whole world with coal, with oil, and everything that you can imagine,” he said. “And we, unfortunately, discover oil and gas only now. And the Europeans are lecturing us: We have to move away from fossil fuel.”

    He said the gas field could generate USD100 billion or more in revenue.

    “I have no authority to make any proposal, but I can make one off the top of my head,” Ramos-Horta said. “The Europeans, Australia, the US, give us USD100 billion and we give up on the Greater Sunrise development. As simple as that.”

    Earlier yesterday, Australia and East Timor signed a defence agreement aimed at increasing the military and security cooperation, especially along their shared maritime border.

    - Advertisement -
    spot_img

    Latest article

    - Advertisement -
    spot_img