26.3 C
Brunei
Monday, June 27, 2022
26.3 C
Brunei
Monday, June 27, 2022
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    Brunei second least at climate risk in ASEAN

    Azlan Othman

    Brunei Darussalam ranked second least at risk in Asean in Global Climate Risk Index 2021 at 176th place.

    The index is an annual ranking from research group Germanwatch. Climate change has consequences for ecosystems and agricultural activities because of changes in rainfall patterns and temperature.

    The Global Climate Risk Index 2021 analyses and ranks to what extent countries and regions have been affected by impacts of climate related extreme weather events such as storms, floods and heatwaves. This year’s 16th edition of the Climate Risk Index clearly shows signs of escalating climate change can no longer be ignored – on any continent or in any region.

    Impacts from extreme-weather hit the poorest countries hardest as these are particularly vulnerable to the damaging effects of a hazard, have a lower coping capacity and may need more time to rebuild and recover.

    The Global Climate Risk Index indicates a level of exposure and vulnerability to extreme weather events, which countries should understand as warnings to be prepared for more frequent and/or more severe events in the future.

    Meanwhile according to the ASEAN first State of Climate Change Report (ASCCR) launched on October 7, changing climate patterns may exacerbate weather-related disasters leading to more frequent and intense natural disasters.

    Such report indicate that, due to global warming, Brunei Darussalam will likely experience an increase in temperature at a rate of 0.5 degrees Celsius per decade with rainfall projection increasing at 10.8mm per year until 2100.

    As for projected extreme event as reported in the report include increase in sea level rise in next 30–50 years, and increase in unpredictable extreme rainfall events resulting in flash floods and landslides.

    According to the report, major impact in key sectors for the Sultanate include rainfed rice crop may be affected by reduced rainfall; delayed rainy season may affect soil salinity and agricultural production; sea water intrusion can damage coastal ecosystems, affecting fisheries; increased sea temperatures can damage corals; bushfires during dry periods from February to March can affect respiratory health; and possible impact on dengue spread.

    The State of Climate Change Report provides an overall outlook on the state of climate change in the ASEAN region and outlines opportunities for cooperation and collaboration towards 2050 climate targets.

    Published ahead of the global climate change conference in Glasgow beginning today, the report represents a milestone for ASEAN, signifying a renewed, bolder collective commitment towards global climate agenda.

    “The report is designed to inform and guide the region and ASEAN member states towards ambitious climate change targets, through a framework for transparency and transformative action to mitigate and adapt to climate change,” Deputy Secretary-General of ASEAN for ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community Kung Phoak said.

    “The report also constitutes an important step towards an ASEAN climate action vision, which includes priority actions by 2030 and key enabling environment up to 2050,” he concluded.

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