22.4 C
Brunei
Sunday, December 4, 2022
22.4 C
Brunei
Sunday, December 4, 2022
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    A bland horror flick

    Jake Coyle

    I have mostly frowny faces for Smile, a bluntly unsettling and blandly grim new horror flick that wrings as much mileage as it can out of a twisted grin.

    Parker Finn’s directorial debut adapts his own 11-minute short into a jump scare-rich thriller about a hospital emergency ward therapist, Dr Rose Cutter (Sosie Bacon), whose visit with a newly admitted patient rapidly turns gruesome.

    The young woman (Caitlin Stasey), beside herself with fear, suddenly flashes an ear-to-ear smile before slicing an ear-to-ear cut across her neck.

    Rose at first brushes off the disturbing encounter. It’s clear that, despite her profession, this has been her way of dealing with trauma since she witnessed the overdose death of her mother as a child.

    Soon, Rose is seeing that creepy smile on other faces.

    Caitlin Stasey in a scene from ‘Smile’. PHOTOS: AP
    Sosie Bacon and and Kyle Gallner in a scene from the film

    Increasingly unhinged and paranoid, she believes she’s been cursed by an evil presence that, she comes to believe, is passed from person to person the way the unseen demon of It Follows was transferred through intimate acts.

    The devilish grin is both the movie’s poster-ready image and an impossible-to-miss metaphor for putting a bright face on unexamined pain. Somewhere, you might imagine, the Joker is tapping his foot, miffed.

    Smile, of course, isn’t the first film to think trouble can lurk behind a smile.

    That’s just one of many derivative elements to Smile, a horror movie that makes a few feeble gestures at sliding toward the so-called elevated variety of horror.

    But there’s nothing in the film’s limp cinematography or flat atmospherics that suggest anything but cheap thrills. Trauma, of course, has become a favourite subject of Hollywood’s in recent years. Smile is far from the first to trade on trauma as a plot device but it may do so more than any other film I can remember.

    There are moments here and there that suggest Smile might actually invest in its protagonist’s grief. Bacon, daughter of Kevin Bacon and Kyra Sedgwick, is impressively committed to the part, and her spiralling fear at both the malignant force haunting her and her own tenuous grip on reality is easily the best thing in Smile. (Okay, the best thing is the terrific character Rob Morgan, but his appearance is extremely brief). But at every turn, Smile detours instead to some horror cliche, eventually leading all the way to a monster in a remote cabin.

    I know. It should surprise no one that a movie marketed with creepy smiling fans at Major League Baseball (MLB) games might not actually have genuine concerns about pain and healing on its mind. But it still makes Smile a cynical and shallow piece of work unlikely to put a you-know-what on too many faces.

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