Most popular Malaysian meat dishes

KARI KAMBING MALAYSIA, INDONESIA

Kari kambing is a goat curry that is popular in Malaysia and Indonesia. It is made with a combination of goat meat cut into chunks, potatoes, tomatoes, curry leaves, ginger, onions, coconut milk, chili peppers, and various other spices such as galangal, turmeric, and lemongrass.

The curry is simmered until the potatoes and the meat both become tender. The dish can be served immediately, but some say that it’s even better the next day when reheated. Serve it with rice or flatbreads.

MASAK LEMAK NEGERI SEMBILAN, MALAYSIA

Masak lemak is a vibrant yellow Malaysian curry with a supposed origin in Negeri Sembilan. The dish can be prepared with various proteins such as chicken, fish, beef, or seafood, but the base is always the same – a creamy, incredibly flavourful, and spicy combination of turmeric, coconut milk, and various other herbs and spices.

The dish is also known as masak lemak cili api (padi), in which the last two words refer to the use of chilies in the dish. Masak lemak is enjoyed throughout Malaysia and it is usually served accompanied by sambal, rice, and raw vegetables (ulam).

Kari Kambing. PHOTOS: TASTEATLAS
Ayam masak merah

AYAM PERCIK KELANTAN, MALAYSIA

Hailing from Kelantan, ayam percik comprises marinated chicken that is traditionally slowly grilled over charcoal.

It is prepared with bone-in cuts that are generously seasoned with a spice blend that usually incorporates coconut milk, cumin, turmeric, coriander, lemongrass, galangal, ginger, and chili peppers.

The chicken is traditionally served alongside rice and (optionally) fresh vegetables or salads.

LOH BAK MALAYSIA, ASIA

Loh bak or ngo hiang is a dish that presumably originated among Teochew and Hokkien communities. It comprises various meat and vegetable fillings that are wrapped in bean curd skins before they are deep-fried until crispy. Variations include shrimps, chicken meat,
or taro.

The fillings are always seasoned with five-spice powder, whose Chinese name (ngó-hiong-hún) gave the dish its name. Although their origin is probably in Southeast China, these crispy rolls have become a staple in many Asian countries, including Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

Loh bak rolls are usually served with a dipping sauce on the side, and they are often accompanied by other deep-fried snacks. They are mainly sold and enjoyed as street food.

AYAM MASAK MERAH MALAYSIA, ASIA

Ayam masak merah is a Malaysian dish made with chicken pieces that are doused in a rich, spicy, and creamy tomato sauce. Chicken pieces are first fried, then simmered in a sauce comprising tomatoes, chili peppers, onions, garlic, and various spices such as galangal, cloves, cinnamon, and cardamom.

Coconut milk is sometimes added to give the sauce creaminess. Ayam masak merah is not an everyday dish – it is typically prepared for various celebrations and special occasions. Serve this festive dish with rice and a fresh salad on the side. – TasteAtlas