Are you game for obstacle challenges? Try parkour

Are you game for obstacle challenges? Try parkour

[Features]Over the years, parkour has gained popularity around the globe. The thrill of parkour, manoeuvring through any obstacles, began in France in the 90s.⁣⁣Over the years, the practice of parkour has grown. In 2017, the United Kingdom (UK) became the first country to recognise parkour as an official sport.⁣⁣This sport has picked up quite a following in Brunei Darussalam, especially among young people.⁣⁣Video: Aziz Idris⁣⁣Read more on our Features page or click the link in bio @borneobulletin ⁣⁣#features #borneobulletin #brunei #bruneinews⁣⁣🔴 Viewer discretion is advised; All the stunts done in the video are done by professionals or/and years of training and guidance by professionals supervision. Please do not try this at home or without a professional supervision.

Posted by Borneo Bulletin on Saturday, 4 July 2020

Syazwani Hj Rosli

Over the years, parkour has gain popularity around the globe.

The thrill of parkour, manoeuvring through any obstacles, began in France in the 90s.

David Belle developed the concept of parkour to precept the art of movement laid down by his father, Raymond Belle.

Over the years, the practice of parkour has grown. In 2017, the United Kingdom (UK) became the first country to recognise parkour as an official sport.

This sport has picked up quite a following in Brunei Darussalam, especially among young people.

Twice a week, local parkour practitioners train at the Hassanal Bolkiah National Sports Complex Indoor Stadium.

Parkour is the sport of traversing obstacles in a man-made or natural environment through the use of running, vaulting, jumping, climbing, and rolling. PHOTOS: RAHWANI ZAHARI
Members of the Brunei Parkour community practising at Hassanal Bolkiah National Sports Complex Indoor Stadium

Brunei Parkour has been around for more than 10 years now, first started in 2008 by two friends, Shafique Husain and Jimbo.

A spokesperson of Brunei Parkour Safwan bin Haji Mohammad said Shafique learnt about parkour in the UK. When he returned to Brunei, he wanted to share it with the local community.

“Brunei Parkour has been part of many different projects. That’s how the group began to grow.

“I found out about Brunei Parkour from a musical that I participated,” he said. To date, there are more than 20 members of Brunei Parkour who help organised events such as workshops and shows.

There are around 60 students who join as regular practitioners.

“With the extremities of parkour, of course risk is there. When we teach beginners, we emphasise safety above all else.

“They need to know how to land and roll properly. We don’t expect everyone to be a professional. We would show them the basics like jumping over obstacles and how to drop down.

“When it comes to safety, we focus on how to minimise risk. We reduce risk by warming up properly, learning how to land and how to dissipate energy.

“For example, when you land, you need to spread your energy outward so that the impact on your joints, arms, body, legs, is less,” he said.

“We think of injuries as a learn ing process. We pass that knowledge to others so they can learn from it.” Many practitioners see parkour as something that gives them the sense of freedom and a challenge at the same time. Being able to overcome the obstacles gives great satisfaction.

“When we are practising, the feelings can be different because personally, I see it as a huge challenge to overcome the obstacles despite my size.

“There is a sense of wanting to challenge yourself and overcome your own struggles. To overcomesuch obstacles is just amazing,”

he said. When asked about Brunei Parkour future plans, Safwan hopes the community will grow not just in numbers but in quality as well.

“There are many inspiring and leading parkour practitioners around the world but for some of us, we look up to this group called Storror from the UK.

“They were recently in this Netflix movie called Six Underground by Michael Bay. They started small and suddenly they’re on the big screen. That was interesting.

“So, if we have the opportunity to showcase what Brunei has to offer, especially on the big screen, I think that would be amazing,” he said. Safwan said they have received strong support, especially from the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sports and the Brunei Adventure Recreation Association (BARA) as well as a few parkour groups within the higher education institutions. “Anyone can do parkour. I hope people will not be intimidated and learn parkour. We will help you along the way.”