Apple rolls out new streaming TV service for USD5 a month

Michael Liedtke

CUPERTINO, California (AP) – Apple is finally taking on Netflix with its own streaming television service and, uncharacteristically for the company, offering it at a bargain price — USD5 a month beginning on November 1.

Walt Disney Co is launching its own assault on Netflix the same month, for just USD7.

It may be sheer coincidence that the cost of paying for both Apple and Disney subscriptions will still be a dollar less than Netflix’s main plan, priced at USD13 a month. But the intent to disrupt Netflix’s huge lead in the streaming business couldn’t be clearer.

Apple delivered the news on Tuesday while also unveiling three new iPhones that won’t look much different than last year’s models other than boasting an additional camera for taking pictures from extra-wide angles.

The aggressive pricing is unusual for Apple, which typically charges a premium for products and services to burnish its brand. Most analysts expected Apple to charge USD8 to USD10 per month for the service, which will be called Apple TV Plus.

But Apple is entering a market that Netflix practically created in 2007 — around the same time as the first iPhone came out. And Netflix has amassed more than 150 million subscribers, meaning that Apple needed to make a splash.

“You have to expect they’re going to do something, considering how hyper competitive the streaming video space is,” said Tim Hanlon, CEO of Vertere Group.

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks on-stage during a product launch event at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California. PHOTOS: AFP/AP
ABOVE & BELOW: Apple CEO Tim Cook looks at the the new iPhone 11 Pro Max; and attendees get a look at the new products at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino, California

Apple CEO Tim Cook did not have much new to say about the TV service beyond its pricing and debut date, although he did show a trailer for a new Jason Momoa-led series called See.

Netflix declined to comment. In the past, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has depicted the increased competition as a positive for everyone, allowing consumers to create their own entertainment bundles instead of accepting bundles put together at higher prices by cable and satellite TV services.

Like Netflix and similar services from Amazon and Hulu, Apple has been spending billions of dollars for original programmes. The most anticipated so far seems to be The Morning Show, a comedy starring Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carrell. The service will launch with nine original shows and films, with more expected each month. It will only carry Apple’s original programming and will be available in 100 countries at launch.

Since it began focussing on exclusive shows and movies six years ago, Netflix has built a huge library of original programming and now spends upward of USD10 billion annually on its lineup.

Apple also announced a new videogame subscription service that will cost USD5 a month when it rolls out on September 19. Called Apple Arcade, the service will allow subscribers to play more than 100 games selected by Apple that are exclusive to the service.

The Disney Co, one of the most hallowed brands in entertainment, is also muscling its way into the market with a streaming service featuring its treasured vault of films and original programming.

That means both Apple and Disney will be undercutting the industry leaders. Besides Netflix, there is Amazon at USD9 per month and Hulu at USD6 per month.

The price war is unfolding as Netflix tries to bounce back from a rough spring in which it suffered its first quarterly drop in United States (US) subscribers since 2011. Apple’s pricing tactics caught investors’ attention. Netflix’s stock fell two per cent on Tuesday.

Each new entry into the crowded video subscription market stretches the limits of just how many monthly plans viewers are willing to pay for.

The Apple streaming service will, at least for now, offer fewer viewing options than Netflix or Disney but also at a significantly lower price.

Apple’s pricing shows it is serious, and the company will probably take a loss “as it plays catch-up,” said Colin Gillis, director of research at Chatham Road Partners.

Hoping to propel its streaming service to a fast start while also boosting iPhone sales, Apple will give a year of free TV access to anyone who buys an iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch or Mac.