US schools still struggling with how to teach about slavery

|      Carolyn Thompson      |

“THEY made me a slave today.”

Aneka Burton still remem-bers the way her then 10-year-old son, Nikko, who is black, recounted his experience to his grandfather after school one day in the United States (US).

It was 2011. But Burton believes the classroom exercise in which Nikko’s classmates were encouraged to examine and pretend to bid on each other during a history lesson continues to affect his life, even now as an 18-year-old high school graduate.

“He tries to act like it didn’t bother him, but I really think it changed him,” the Gahanna, Ohio, mother said.

It’s those memories that leave her shaking her head years later as reports about mock slave auctions continue to emerge, reminders that schools are still struggling with how to teach about slavery and its impacts.

There are no national standards on how to teach about slavery, although it is often recommended as a topic in curriculum at the state and local levels, according to Executive Director of the National Council for the Social Studies Lawrence Paska. The guidance leaves specific lessons up to schools and teachers, who on several occasions have caused offense with attempts to bring history to life.

A mother picks up her son Turner from his school in Georgia. – AP

An investigation by New York Attorney General Letitia James found in May that a mock “slave auction” that singled out black students at the private Chapel School in Westchester County had a profoundly negative effect on all involved students.

“Lessons designed to separate children on the basis of race have no place in New York classrooms, or in classrooms throughout this country,” James said.

Other recent examples include an Escaping Slavery game that gave North Carolina fourth-graders a freedom punch card that read, “If your group runs into trouble four times, you will be severely punished and sent back to the plantation to work as a slave.” Families also criticised a Virginia obstacle course intended to replicate the underground railroad, navigated by third-, fourth- and fifth-graders pretending to be runaway slaves.

“Teaching about slavery is hard,” summarised a 2018 report from the Southern Poverty Law Centre, which surveyed more than 1,700 social studies teachers and analysed textbooks.

“No national consensus exists on how to teach about slavery, and there is little leadership. … It is time to change this state of affairs.”

Dozens of teachers surveyed reported simulations as their favourite lessons when teaching about slavery, according to the report, though its authors and others said such re-enactments do more harm than good.

At the Chapel School, the fifth-grade teacher who led the mock auction in March was fired. The school agreed to hire a diversity officer and change its discipline practices after parents complained that black students were lined up against a wall wearing imaginary shackles and “sold” to their white peers.

Nicole Dayes complained about a similar exercise in her son’s fourth-grade class in upstate New York’s Watertown City School District in May after he described it to her.

“His whole demeanor changed,” Dayes said. “It was kind of somber and uncomfortable … It took me a while to really comprehend what he was saying to me.”

The district said in a statement the teacher had been placed on administrative leave. Superintendent Patricia LaBarr said the district has since sought expert guidance on diversity, inclusion and equity as it reviews its policies and programs.

New York’s social studies curriculum is typical in that it outlines grade-level concepts — fourth-grade students “will examine life as a slave in New York state,” for example — but does not provide specific lessons.

Ill-conceived lessons happen enough that advocates like Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, offer lesson plans with suggestions for texts and discussion. Teaching Tolerance plans to publish a framework for teaching about slavery in grades kindergarten through five in August. – AP